Estrangement and Tragedy: Exploring the alienating sensation in ancient Greek tragedies and modern reperformances.

dc.contributor.advisorBlankenborg, R.J.J.
dc.contributor.advisorLardinois, A.P.M.H.
dc.contributor.authorZwertbroek, Floor M.E.
dc.date.issued2018-08-07
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, the argument is that estrangement plays a major part in the audience perception of three ancient Greek plays – despite Aristotle’s appreciation of ‘acknowledgment’ and ‘recognition’: his view would in fact better suit the modern staging of ancient Greek tragedies than the performance in antiquity. To this end, both secondary literature and primary text on singular and isolated plot elements that may cause estrangement are analyzed. Reversely, these same elements have been analyzed in recent examples of restaging. The conclusion entails that fifth century tragedies were more estranging for the audience back then than for the public of a contemporary re-enactment and that the reflection on the ancient plays through their modern reperformances offers new insights and vice versa.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://theses.ubn.ru.nl/handle/123456789/7296
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.thesis.facultyFaculteit der Letterenen_US
dc.thesis.specialisationGriekse en Latijnse taal- en letterkundeen_US
dc.thesis.studyprogrammeMaster Oudheidstudiesen_US
dc.thesis.typeMasteren_US
dc.titleEstrangement and Tragedy: Exploring the alienating sensation in ancient Greek tragedies and modern reperformances.en_US
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Zwertbroek, F.M.E. 4170148 07-08-2018.pdf
Size:
840.69 KB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description: